Home > Kanga Products, Kits, Making Waves, Radio and electronics, Uncategorized > Making Waves – Building the KANGA Products OXO Transmitter Kit (Part 1)

Making Waves – Building the KANGA Products OXO Transmitter Kit (Part 1)

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As it’s nearing Christmas 2019, I decided to treat myself to an OXO TX kit from Kanga Products UK.  This is an updated version of the OXO transceiver made famous by the late GM3OXX now providing a multi-band version.  So I ordered it from KANGA and it turned up here yesterday in a jiffy bag/envelope.  Taking it out it was nicely packaged in a sealed plastic sleeve.

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Making sure I had all necessary test equipment ready (including the Sandford Wattmeter also from Kanga Products) I set to work to start assembling it on the CVO towers workbench.

Opening up the outer sleeve and removing the contents I was pleased to see that all the components were sorted in separate bags of resistors, capacitors, transistors, etc.  tis makes individual components much easier to find as opposed to just having everything dumped into a single bag.

3 everything sorted into individual bags

The instructions needed to be downloaded from the website and consisted of a three page .PDF file.  To quote one paragraph from them:

“Though the fitting of the parts is straight forward, it is highly recommended that all components are soldered in the order they are listed in the component list”

Although this may seem a no brainer it is good advice as you can then mark off each component as it is fitted and it runs in order of resistors, capacitors, transistors, crystals and then connectors.  This also follows the order of the bags.  My only criticism here is that the coil isn’t mentioned in the list but is mentioned in a separate paragraph.  It needs winding by hand and is 17 turns of 24SWG ECW wound on a very small ferrite toroidal core.  This is surface mount and laid flat on the PCB and should be mounted first ideally.

4The PCB is nicely printed and fairly easy to follow

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So, contrary to my earlier advice I first fitted the resistors to the board.  Fairly easy through hole devices and Dennis, from Kanga UK, has kindly listed the colour coding of each resistor beside its value in the list.  Not really necessary for those of us in the know but for those not familiar with resistor colour codes a handy help.

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Next I wound the coil.  The former is very small and this can be fiddly.  Note, if you are going to build one yourself do leave the ends long as if you cut them too short….  Anyway once wound I fitted the coil to the board using the plastic screw, washer and nut supplied before soldering the tails to the pads on the board.  Contrary to popular belief the enamel coating on the copper wire doesn’t melt away to reveal bare copper when you apply a soldering iron.  I use a Dremel Multi-tool to remove some of the enamel coating before applying solder.  Once this was secure I then applied the capacitors in order, with the large electrolytic one being fitted last of all, ensuring the polarity was correct.  that was it for today as work got in the way but I will continue when I next get round and will hopefully have it complete and ready to test next time.

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