Building Block kits

As radio amateurs we all love to build kits – maybe a test meter, maybe a small receiver or whatever but, if it is home built it is something we can be proud of.  With this in mind, M0CVO Antennas designed the VXO Oscillator kits way back in 2017.  I their simplicity these are based around a Colpitt’s Oscillator and provide a sine wave output that can be followed by a mixer by other modules to create a small transmitter, a receiver (Direct Conversion) or many other things where a stable known signal source is required.These became popular in the UK for Foundation Licence radio amateurs who wished to advance to the Intermediate Licence, part of the course for which entails building a kit that would/could be useful in the radio shack later.  They are currently available for either 40m (7.030MHz) or 20m (14.060MHz).  Both of these are available from HERE. This kit, whichever frequency you choose, is the BB1 kit or Building Block #1.

untitled The VXO Oscillator.

Moving on a couple of years, M0CVO Antennas has now developed and released the second building block kit – the BB2.  This is a class A follow on/buffer amplifier.  Similarly to the BB1 kit is is rather simple in construction, the idea being for self learning in electronics so it can be built by anyone, whatever their level of electronics experience.  They are supplied with PCB and all components needed to build the unit but the constructor must supply their own enclosure if they require one.  All inputs and outputs are via MOLEX connectors.

20190509_135308  Completed BB2 Kit

If a crystal oscillator or VFO is used as the input (eg the VXO Oscillator Kit) this will increase the output signal power to ~1W depending on input voltage (9 – 12V DC).  A couple of these have been constructed and tested as can be seen in the following images:

20190511_091550 20190511_091539 20190511_091534 Under test

The fourth MOLEX connector at the top of the board is for either a switch or a CW Key.  It can be used in its complete state, with a suitable signal source, as a QRP(P) transmitter.  However, suitable filters (band pass or low pass) must be used and a suitable antenna must be connected.  Also a relevant amateur radio licence must be held in order to use it thus. These are available from HERE.

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